Wednesday 26th of July 2017 10:44:32 AM

center

This BOX ist centered and adjusts itself to the browser window.
The height ajusts itself to the content.
more nice and free css templates

body {
background-color: #e1ddd9;
font-size: 12px;
font-family: Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, SunSans-Regular, Sans-Serif;
color:#564b47;
margin: 20px 140px  20px 140px;
text-align: center;
}
#content {
width: 100%;
padding: 0px;
text-align: left;
background-color: #fff;
overflow: auto;
}

By defining a set of programming language independent interfaces that allow the accessing and mutation of XML documents, the W3C made it easier for programmers to deal with XML. Not only does XML address the need for a standard information encoding and storage format, it also allows programmers a standard way to use that information. SAX is a very low level API, but it is more than what has been available before it. DOM is a higher level API that even provides a default object model for all XML documents (saving time in creating one from scratch if you are using data is document data).

SAX, DOM and XML are very developer friendly because developers are going to decide whether this technology will be adopted by the majority and become a successful effort towards the goal of interoperable, platform, and device independent computing.

XML is web enabled

XML is derived from SGML, and so was HTML. So in essence, the current infrastructure available today to deal with HTML content can be re-used to work with XML. This is a very big advantage towards delivering XML content using the software and networking infrastructure already in place today. This should be a big plus in considering XML for use in any of your projects, because XML naturally lends itself to being used over the web.

App server developers are not restricted to using HTTP, they can transmit and recieve XML information using simple remote CORBA objects and RMI objects. The key is that by using XML, it makes these remote services or objects easier to build. And, by sticking with XML, any one of these technologies can be used in your design of your app server. You can use whatever technology is most appropriate to getting the job done, knowing that all the information flows as XML and can be processed by any part of the system. The reason Java object serialization did not achieve this is because it encodes object data to a binary format that is dependent on too many things (like the JVM version, and the existence of classes when things are deserialized, etc). XML is not limited by any of these restrictions (or problems), which makes it much easier to create systems that allow XML information to flow between different subsystems. Also by relying only on the data, large portions of the system can be replaced with better or different implementations for future-readiness.

App servers traditionally give their client apps access to information in remote databases, remote file systems, remote object repositories, remote web resources, and even other app servers. All these information sources don't even need to reside on the machine that hosts the app server. These remote resources may be on other machines on the Intranet or the Internet. Using Java and XML, RMI, JDBC, CORBA, JNDI, Servlet and Swing, you can create app servers that can integrate all kinds of remote and local information resources, and client apps that allow you to remotely or locally access this information from the app server.

In the future, with publicly available DTDs that are standardized for each vertical industry, XML based app servers will become very popular. Also when XML schema repositories become available and widely used, app servers will be able to take on a new role and provide application services that are not offered now. Companies will need to share information with other companies in related fields, and each company might have a different software system in which all their data is housed. By agreeing upon a set of DTDs or schemas (encoded in XML), these companies can exchange information with each other regardless of what systems they are using to store this information. If their app servers can exchange XML documents (based on some shared DTD or schema), then these disparate app servers can understand each other and share information. One of the uses for XML foreseen by the W3C is just this, vertical industries (like insurance and health care) creating sets of DTDs and schemas that all companies in the industry agree upon. Then these companies' app servers can talk to each other using some popular protocol (like HTTP or CORBA/IIOP) to exchange information between each other. This has the potential to save a lot of time and money in the daily business operations of these companies.

Web-based Applications

floatIE4 P/B IE5 P/Q NN4 P/P Op3 B/-

Sets the float direction for an element. This is generally applied to images in order to allow text to flow around them, but under CSS1 any element may be floated. Note that, for elements such as paragraph, floating the element will cause its width to tend toward zero unless an explicit width is assigned; thus, width assignment is a crucial part of floating any nonreplaced element.

Example

IMG {float: left;}

Negative margins have an impact on vertical formatting, affecting howmargins are collapsed. If there are negative vertical margins, thenthe browser should take the absolutemaximum of the negative margins and subtract that from the maximum ofany positive margins.

In the case where there are only two margins to be collapsed, onepositive and the other negative, the situation is handled in a fairlysimple manner. The absolute value of the negative margin issubtracted from the positive margin -- or, to put it another way,