Wednesday 26th of July 2017 10:44:06 AM

MENU

#left {
position: absolute;
left: 0px;
width: 190px;
color: #564b47;
margin: 0px;
padding: 0px;
}

This column inherited it'b background color from the body definition. The padding ist defined through the p element.

CONTENT

3 columns / menu fixed, content dynamic with head and footer.
3 column layout grid. The navigation column are fixed in width, the content column is dynamic and adjusts itself to the browser window.

This layout also works with an absolute height template 100% height
more nice and free css templates

html {
padding:0px;
margin:0px;
}
body {
background-color: #e1ddd9;
font-size: 12px;
font-family: Verdana, Arial, SunSans-Regular, Sans-Serif;
color:#564b47;
padding:0px;
margin:0px;
}
#content {
margin: 0px 190px 0px 190px;
border-left: 2px solid #564b47;
border-right: 2px solid #564b47;
padding: 0px;
background-color: #ffffff;
}

in valid code we trust (*^_^*) miss monorom

10.2.3.4. :first-child

The last of the new pseudo-class selectors we'll cover here is the :first-child selector. This is used to match an element that is the first child of another element. For example, you might want to make the first child of every DIV italicized instead of normal text, as long as that first child is a paragraph (shown in Figure 10-11):

Figure 10-11

Figure 10-11. Selecting styles for certain first children

There are advantages and disadvantages to using some of the strategies to import and export XML. The complexity of your application data and available system resources are factors that would determine what strategy should be used.

Client and Server side - Application Servers

The 2nd category of Java applications called Java Application Servers (or app servers) and they make good use of XML. Unlike client side graphical Java apps (from the previous section) which are very standalone in their operations, app servers tie many different networked software components together in order to provide information from multiple sources to a set of client side Java apps or web browsers (maybe even running on different devices). This is shown in Figure 2. An app server is actually a conglomeration of several distributed and client/server software systems. So when you write an app server, you are actually writing many different software systems which are all networked to work together, to process information that comes from various sources, and distribute this information to a set of client apps (that you also have to write) running on different devices and platforms.

Web-based applications are similar to app servers, except for one thing: Web-based applications don't have client apps, instead they use web browsers on the client side. They generate their front ends using HTML, which is dynamically generated by the web-based app. In the Java world, Servlets are best suited for this job.

Web-based apps might themselves rely on another app server to gather information that is presented on the client web browser. Also, you can write Servlets that get information from remote or local databases, XML document repositories and even other Servlets. One good use for web-based apps is to be a wrapper around an app server, so that you can allow your customers to access at least part of the services offered by your app server via a simple web browser. So web-based apps allow you to integrate many components including app servers, and provide access to this information over the web via a simple web browser.

Web-based apps are very deployable, since they don't require special Java VMs to be installed on the client side, or any other special plug ins, if the creator of the web-based app relies solely on HTML. Unfortunately, this can restrict the level of service that can be offered by a web-based app when compared to the functionality offered by custom clients of an app server, but they are a good compromise when it comes to providing web-based access to your information. In fact, in a real world scenario, both a web-based app and app server may be used together, in order to provide your customers access to their information. In an Intranet setting, you might deploy the clients that come with the app server, and in an Internet setting it would be better to deploy a web-based app that sits on top of this app server, and gives your customers (relatively) limited access to their data over the web (via a simple web browser).

<STRONG> regular </STRONG></B></STRONG></SPAN>. </P>

Ignoring the fact that this would be entirely counterintuitive, what we see in Figure 5-16 is that the main paragraph text has a weight of 900 and the SPAN aweight of 700. When the STRONG text is set to lighter, it evaluates to the next-lighter face, which is the regular face, or 400 (the same as normal) on the numeric scale. The next stepbeen displayed by the user agent. In this case, it's up to the user agent to decide whether or not the document should be reflowed. The CSS specifications explicitly state that user agents are not required to reflow previous content to accommodate things which happen later in the document. In other words, if an image is floated up into a previous paragraph, it may simply overwrite whatever was already there. On the other hand, the user agent may handle the situation by flowing content around the float, even though doing so isn't required behavior. Either way, it's probably a bad idea to count on a particular behavior, which makes the utility of