Monday 20th of November 2017 02:45:07 AM

MENU

#left {
position: absolute;
left: 0px;
width: 190px;
color: #564b47;
margin: 0px;
padding: 0px;
}

This column inherited it'b background color from the body definition. The padding ist defined through the p element.

CONTENT

3 columns / menu fixed, content dynamic with head and footer.
3 column layout grid. The navigation column are fixed in width, the content column is dynamic and adjusts itself to the browser window.

This layout also works with an absolute height template 100% height
more nice and free css templates

html {
padding:0px;
margin:0px;
}
body {
background-color: #e1ddd9;
font-size: 12px;
font-family: Verdana, Arial, SunSans-Regular, Sans-Serif;
color:#564b47;
padding:0px;
margin:0px;
}
#content {
margin: 0px 190px 0px 190px;
border-left: 2px solid #564b47;
border-right: 2px solid #564b47;
padding: 0px;
background-color: #ffffff;
}

in valid code we trust (*^_^*) miss monorom

A[name] {color: purple;}      /* colors any NAME anchor purple */IMG[border] {border-color: blue;}  /* sets blue border for any bordered IMG */[class] {color: red;}        /* sets any classed element red */

In none of these situations does it matter what value is assigned tothe attributes of each element. As long as the given attribute ispresent for the element, the element will match the selector shown.Thus, in the following example, the first two IMGelements shown will match the preceding rule, whereas the third willnot, as illustrated by Figure 10-7: XML is derived from SGML, and so was HTML. So in essence, the current infrastructure available today to deal with HTML content can be re-used to work with XML. This is a very big advantage towards delivering XML content using the software and networking infrastructure already in place today. This should be a big plus in considering XML for use in any of your projects, because XML naturally lends itself to being used over the web.

Even if clients don't support XML natively, it is not a big hindrance. In fact, Java with Servlets (on the server side) can convert XML with stylesheets to generate plain HTML that can be displayed in all web browsers.

Using XML to pass parameters and return values on servers makes it very easy to allow these servers to be web-enabled. A thin server side Java layer might be added that interacts with web browsers using HTML and translates the requests and responses from the client into XML, that is then fed into the server.

XML is totally extensible

By not predefining any tags in the XML Recommendation, the W3C allowed developers full control over customizing their data as they see fit. This makes XML very attractive to encoding data that already exists in legacy databases (by using database metadata, and other schema information). This extensibility of XML makes it such a great fit when trying to get different systems to work with each other.

be discussed in Chapter 5, "Fonts",line-height refers to the distance between thebaselines of lines of text -- sort of. In fact, this propertydetermines the amount by which the height of each element'sline box is increased or decreased. In the simplest cases, it'sa way of increasing (or decreasing) the vertical space between linesof text, but this is a misleadingly simple way of looking at howline-height works. If you're familiar withdesktop publishing packages, then line-heightcontrols the
Figure 6-57

Figure 6-57. Perfect alignment of backgrounds

How is this perfect alignment possible? Remember, when a background is fixed , the origin element is positioned with respect to the canvas. Thus, both background patterns begin tiling from the top left corner of the document, not the individual elements. For the BODY, we can see the entire repeat pattern. For the H1, however, the only place we can see its background is in the padding and content of the H1 itself. Since both background images are the same size, and they have precisely the same origin position, they