Sunday 28th of May 2017 06:27:59 PM

MENU left

Menu with fixed width.

#left {
width:175px;
padding:0px;
float:left;
}

CONTENT

All templates are XHTML 1.0 and CSS2/ tableless.
3 columns layout grid. All colums are fixed and centered.
more nice and free css templates

html {
padding:0px;
margin:0px;
}
body {
background-color: #e1ddd9;
font-size: 12px;
color:#564b47;
text-align:center;
margin:0px;
padding:0px;
}
#box {
width:750px;
margin: 0px auto;
padding:0px;
text-align:left;
}
#content {
width:400px;
padding:0px;
float:left;
background-color:#fff;
overflow: auto;
}
#head {
background-color:transparent;
}

The applications that you create with Java and XML will rely on the services provided by your Java XML Parser (using DOM or SAX). The information itself might be stored in a variety of persistence engines (object databases, relational databases, file systems, dynamic websites, etc.). The information however that comes out of these persistence storage engines must be converted to XML (if they are not in XML already). Once this is done, you have to be concerned with the material covered in this document. This document outlines the most popular Java XML application categories that are possible in an environment where data is encoded with XML, where web access is ubiquitous and platform independence is a necessity.

Java Application Layer

All of the code that you write (in your Java classes) might be considered the Java application layer. Other layers are the XML Parser layer, the XML source (that supplies the XML data that is necessary), and the persistence engine (where the data is actually stored and retrieved by the source).

Your code (in the Java application layer) has to make use of the DOM or SAX API and the XML parser in order to access the information in XML documents (that come from your source). The source might be responsible for pulling data from different persistence engines (relational or object databases) and even the web (dynamically generated websites that supply only XML data).

In your application layer, you can create many interesting Java applications. The apps can run on the server side or client side or both. They may have graphical user interfaces or they may be web based. When I use the word application or app in this chapter, I don't exclude Java applets; I mean application (or app) in the broad sense of the word, i.e., I mean it to describe a software system written in Java that solves a real-world problem.

Figure 11-3

Figure 11-3. The well-styled sidebar

That was pretty easy, eh? Now let's tackle the navigation bar at the top of the main part of the page. This area also has a green background, and within it are a few images. Again, we use a DIV tag with a specific class, like this:

<DIV CLASS="navbar">
icons
</DIV>

Figure 8-38

Figure 8-38. Get as far to the left (or right) as possible

8.3.2. Applied Behavior

There are a number of interesting consequences of the above rules, both because of what they say and what they don't say. The first thing to discuss is what happens when the floated element is taller than its parent element.not the viewport. If you want to position elements so thatthey're placed relative to the viewport and don't scrollalong with the rest of the document, then the next section is foryou.

Before we get there, however, there are a few more things to cover.Remember that absolutely positioned boxes can have backgrounds,margins, borders, and padding; styles can be applied within them,just as with any other element. This can make them very useful forthe creation of sidebars, "sticky

LI {list-style-position: outside;}
Figure 7-85

Figure 7-85. Placing the bullets outside list items

Should you desire a slightly different appearance, though, you can pull the bullet in toward the content by setting the value to be inside:

LI.first {list-style-position: inside;}

This causes the bullet to be placed "inside" the list item's content. The exact way this happens is undefined, but