Monday 20th of November 2017 02:44:44 AM

MENU

#left {
position: absolute;
left: 0px;
width: 190px;
color: #564b47;
margin: 0px;
padding: 0px;
}
padding: 0px;
}

This column inherited it's background color from the body definition. Padding is defined through p.

CONTENT

3 columns / menu fixed, content and head dynamic.
3 columns layout grid. The navigation columns are fixed in their widths, the content column is dynamic and adjusts itself to the browser window.
The head box is dynamic in its height. It adjusts to the height of the logo.
more nice and free css templates

html {
padding:0px;
margin:0px;
}
body {
background-color: #e1ddd9;
font-size: 12px;
font-family: Verdana, Arial, SunSans-Regular, Sans-Serif;
color:#564b47;
padding:0px;
margin:0px;
}
#content {
margin: 0px 190px 0px 190px;
border-left: 2px solid #564b47;
border-right: 2px solid #564b47;
padding: 0px;
background-color: #ffffff;
}
top: 10%; bottom: auto; left: 50%; right: 10%; height: auto; min-width: 15em;

Here we have a case where the element should be 40% as wide as thecontaining block but can never be less than 15emwide. We've also changed the bottom andheight so that they're automaticallydetermined. This will let the element be as tall as necessary todisplay its content, no matter how narrow it gets (never less than15em, of course!).

We can turn this around to keep elements from getting too wide or whitespace around the > symbol this time, which is legal; whitespace around this symbol is optional.) Thus:

The purple EM text is purple because it's the great-grandchild of an LI that is the direct child of the OL, and the OL is the grandchild of the BODY element. The first EM is not matched because its grandparent OL is not the direct child of a DIV.does not interrupt the counting in ordered lists. Thus, the followingmarkup would have the result shown in Figure 7-80:

OL LI {list-style-type: decimal;}LI.off {list-style-type: none;}<OL><LI>Item the first<LI CLASS="off">Item the second<LI>Item the third<LI CLASS="off">Item the fourth

The simplest category of XML Java applications is the kind of Java application that stores information in XML documents (files). This is illustrated in Figure 1. By using XML to create your own markup languages (i.e. your own file formats for your information) in an open way, you don't have to use propietary and binary file formats. Using XML over proprietary binary file formats, allows your applications to have immense inter operability across platforms, applications and even programming languages. Since any kind of markup language can be defined using XML (you can even formalize it by creating a DTD for it) applications can store their information using their own markup languages. For example, address book information can be stored in an AddressBookML file. A few commercial programs currently available allow saving their application data to XML files, e.g., Framemaker can save its documents as XML files.

In order to create applications of this category, you might have to define a DTD for your information. Then you have to write classes to import and export information from your XML document(s) (validating using your application's DTD if you have one). You must also write the classes which create the user interface in your application. The user of your application can view and modify information using the GUI (graphical user interface), and they can save (and load) their information to (and from) an XML file (that might use your DTD); in other words, they can save (and load) their information to (and from) an ApplicationML file (where Application is the name of your application). Some examples are AddressBookML, MathML, SVGML, etc.

The classes that import and export information from your ApplicationML file must use the parser and SAX or DOM API in order to import the information. These classes can access this information by using one of the following strategies:

    background-image for the moment. We'll comeback to why setting a color is a good idea later on in the chapter.

    A background image can be applied to any element, whether block-levelor inline. BODY is the most common element towhich backgrounds are applied, of course, but there's no needto stop there. For example:

    P.starry{background-image: url(http://www.site.web/pix/stars.gif);color: white;}