Tuesday 16th of January 2018 12:38:35 PM

left

#left {
position: absolute;
left: 2%;
width: 19%;
top: 106px;
background-color: #ffffff;
}

Warning

These pages use certain CSS definitions that are unsupported by older browsers.
more nice and free css templates


css


middleleft

#middleleft {
position: absolute;
left: 22%;
width: 28%;
top: 106px;
background-color: #ffffff;
}

Calculations in your head

This example requires some calculations. The sum of the widths yields 98%. The distance from the border of body to the first box plus its width plu the distance yields the left position of the next box.

If you want boxes of different width you need to adjust these values accordingly.

Use of this code is encouraged!

Try it with 2 or 3 columns



middleright

#middleright {
position: absolute;
left: 51%;
width: 28%;
top: 106px;
background-color: #ffffff;
}

box border

Borders, pading and margin are defined in

#right,#middleright,#middleleft,#left{
border: 1px solid #564b47;
padding:0px;
margin:0px;
}

Font definitions

Padding are passed to p, h1 and h3.

p,h1, h3, pre {
padding: 5px 15px;
margin: 0px;
}


XML is derived from SGML, and so was HTML. So in essence, the current infrastructure available today to deal with HTML content can be re-used to work with XML. This is a very big advantage towards delivering XML content using the software and networking infrastructure already in place today. This should be a big plus in considering XML for use in any of your projects, because XML naturally lends itself to being used over the web.

Even if clients don't support XML natively, it is not a big hindrance. In fact, Java with Servlets (on the server side) can convert XML with stylesheets to generate plain HTML that can be displayed in all web browsers.

Using XML to pass parameters and return values on servers makes it very easy to allow these servers to be web-enabled. A thin server side Java layer might be added that interacts with web browsers using HTML and translates the requests and responses from the client into XML, that is then fed into the server.

XML is totally extensible

Create your own Java object model (adapter) that uses DOM to manipulate the information in your document object tree (that is created by the parser). This is slightly different from the 2nd option, because you are still using the DOM API to manipulate the document information as a tree of nodes, but you are just wrapping an application specific API around the DOM objects, so its easier for you to write the code. So your object model is an adapter on top of DOM (ie, it uses the adapter pattern). This application specific API uses DOM and actually accesses or modifies information by going to the tree of nodes. Changes made to the object model still have to be made persistence (if you want to save any changes). You are in essence creating a thin layer on top of the tree of nodes that the parser creates, where the tree of nodes is accessed or modified eventually depending on what methods you invoke on your object model.

Depending on which of the three options you use to access information using your Java classes, this information must at some point be saved back to a file (probably to the one from which it was read). When the user of your application invokes a File->Save action, the information in the application must be written out to an ApplicationML file. Now this information is stored in memory, either as a (DOM) tree of nodes, or in your own proprietary object model. Also note that most DOM XML parsers can generate XML code from DOM document objects (but its quite trivial to turn a tree of nodes into XML by writing the code to do it yourself). There are 2 basic ways to get this information back into an ApplicationML file: